Christy represents insurers and businesses in a variety of civil litigation matters including insurance coverage, employment, electric, and long-term care claims.

Before obtaining her law degree, Christy spent 13 years working as a sales engineer consulting with end users, engineers, and contractors to design, sell, and install power protection and precision cooling solutions for data centers and industrial applications. This experience provides Christy with unique insight into the responsibilities of professionals whose products and services support mission-critical business operations. By working closely with decision-makers at all levels of the end-user companies, Christy developed an appreciation for the challenges faced by business leaders making major strategic decisions.

Christy earned a BS in Business Administration from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and earned her law degree magna cum laude from Campbell Law School. While in law school, Christy interned in the Office of the Solicitor General of North Carolina and for The Honorable J. Douglas McCullough at the North Carolina Court of Appeals. Before joining Young Moore, she clerked for The Honorable Allegra Collins at the North Carolina Court of Appeals. She is active in several organizations in the community.

 

Education & Bar Admissions

  • J.D., Campbell Law School, 2019, magna cum laude
  • B.S., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Business Administration, 1993

Admissions

  • North Carolina
  • U.S. District Courts for North Carolina

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